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SEX OFFENDER INFORMATION AND QUESTIONS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
  1. What is the significance of June 1, 1996?
    This is the date that Arizona implemented the community notification laws. Any person released from jail, prison, or sentenced to probation on or after this date is subject to community notification.

  2. How is risk level determined?
    Prior to an offender's release or sentence to probation, the agency that had custody of the individual completes a risk assessment screening profile. This instrument evaluates nineteen criteria that are considered to be significant factors contributing to sex offender recidivism. Each criterion is given a score, which is then totaled to arrive at the recommended risk level. All criminal justice agencies must use the standardized Arizona Risk Assessment, however, occasionally law enforcement discovers information which can affect an offender's risk level. As such, law enforcement is given the discretion to either accept the recommended risk level or complete another risk assessment.

  3. Are risk levels consistent nationwide?
    No, each state has slightly different community notification laws, implementation dates, and risk assessment instruments.

  4. What is a Predator?
    In Arizona, all sex offenders classified as "predator" are housed at the State Hospital. Once an offender completes his sentence and is scheduled for release, the offender may be reviewed for violent sexual predator criteria. If it is determined that the offender is a violent sexual predator, Arizona law provides for a civil commitment to the Arizona State Hospital. The sex offender may request an annual review to determine if he is eligible for release into society, at which time the label "predator" is removed.

  5. What agency registers sex offenders?
    The county sheriff is responsible for registering sex offenders living within their county.

  6. Do I have to register if I am visiting/vacationing in Arizona?
    Yes, if you are planning on staying within Arizona for more than 10 days. Failure to comply is a Class 4 Felony!

  7. What are the requirements of a sex offender if he changes his address?
    The offender has 72 hours, exlcuding weekends and legal holidays, to complete a change of address. This must be completed in person, on a sex offender registration form. Failure to comply is a Class 4 Felony.

  8. Can non-sexual offenses require sex offender registration/notification?
    Yes, judges have the authority to court order sex offender registration if there was a finding of sexual motivation.

  9. Do registration and community notification laws apply to juveniles?
    Although registration is mandatory for adults, it is not for juveniles. If a juvenile is adjudicated delinquent of an act that would require an adult to register, the court can require the juvenile to register until the age of twenty-five. Community notification laws may apply if ordered by the court.

  10. Are all sex offenders required to obtain a special Arizona drivers license or identification credential?
    Yes, all sex offenders are required to obtain a credential from the MVD. The credential which is obtained annually, looks identical to any other license except when a law enforcement official checks the status of the credential it indicates that the individual is subject to sex offender registration. Failure to obtain this credential is a Class 1 Misdemeanor with a mandatory $250 assessment.

  11. How can I obtain more detailed information concerning a particular conviction?
    It is incumbent upon the user to contact the court in the "convicting jurisdiction" to gain access to these public documents.

  12. Are sex offenders prohibited from living near schools/daycare centers?
    State law prohibits some Level 3 registered sex offenders from living within 1,000 feet of certain schools or day care facilities; however, several exceptions apply. See ARS 13-3727 listed below.
LAWS

Did you know the origin of Megan's Law?

In July of 1994, Jesse Timmendequas, a convicted sex offender, raped, beat and strangled Megan Nicole Kanka. This sex offender lived across the street from the Kanka family, however the family was never aware of this.

Since Megan's death, the Kanka family has fought to get laws approved that requires each state make public information about sex offenders. Most states do this through an online sex offender registry website. In addition, each sex offender, by law, must be compliant to re-register each time they move or annually. The Kanka family created a foundation in behalf of their daughter and received some 430,000 signatures to create these new proposed laws called 'Megan's Law.'

In 1996 President Bill Clinton signed legislation requiring states to notify communities when a sex offender moves into the area. In signing the law Clinton noted the rights of former offenders, but said "there is no greater right than a parent's right to raise a child in safety and love." Since this time, each state in the nation has developed and maintained an online registry of all the registered sex offenders. In addition, laws have been cracking down on such things that lead to sex crimes, such as child pornography, sexual assaults on children under the age of 16, and sexually lewd acts.

Megan's Law allows the States discretion to establish criteria for disclosure, but compels them to make private and personal information on registered sex offenders available to the public. Community notification: 1. Assists law enforcement in investigations; 2. Establishes legal grounds to hold known sex offenders; 3. Deters sex offenders from committing new sex offenses; 4. Offers citizens information they can use to protect children from Registered Sex Offenders, child molesters and victimization.

Click HERE for more information on the Megan Nicole Kanka Foundation

ARIZONA REVISED STATUTES -Title 13 - Criminal Code

Chapter 38, Article 3 - Registration of Sex Offenders and Offender Monitoring

13-3821 Persons required to register; procedure; identification card; assessment; definitions
13-3822 Notice of moving from place of residence or change of name or electronic information
13-3823 Access to records
13-3824 Violation; classification; assessment
13-3825 Community notification
13-3826 Community notification guidelines committee; members; duties; definition
13-3827 Internet sex offender website; investigation of records; immunity; definition
13-3828 Sex offender monitoring fund
13-3829 Criminal street gang and sex offender monitoring; qualified vendor; definition ARIZONA DISLAIMER AND CONTITIONS OF USE

13-3727 Unlawful residency; persons convicted of criminal offenses; exceptions; preemption; classification

A. It is unlawful for a person who has been convicted of a dangerous crime against children as defined in section 13-705 or who has been convicted of an offense committed in another jurisdiction that if committed in this state would be a dangerous crime against children as defined in section 13-705, who is required to register pursuant to section 13-3821 and who is classified as a level three offender pursuant to section 13-3825 to reside within one thousand feet of the real property comprising any of the following:

1. A private school, as defined in section 15-101, or a public school that provides instruction in kindergarten programs and any combination of kindergarten programs and grades one through eight.
2. A private school, as defined in section 15-101, or a public school that provides instruction in any combination of grades nine through twelve.
3. A child care facility as defined in section 36-881.

B. This section does not apply to any of the following:

1. A person who establishes the person's residence before September 19, 2007 or before a new school or child care facility is located.
2. A person who is a minor.
3. A person who is currently serving a term of probation.
4. A person who has had the person's civil rights restored pursuant to chapter 9 of this title.
5. A person who has not been convicted of a subsequent offense in the previous ten years, excluding any time the person was incarcerated in any federal, state, county or local jail or prison facility.

C. Notwithstanding any other law and as a matter of statewide concern, a county, city or town shall not enact an ordinance that provides for distance restrictions greater than those found in this section.

D. For the purposes of subsection A of this section, measurements shall be made in a straight line in all directions, without regard to intervening structures or objects, from the nearest point on the property line of a parcel containing the person's residence to the nearest point on the property line of a parcel containing a child care facility or a school.

E. A person who violates this section is guilty of a class 1 misdemeanor.

The purpose of this site is to provide information to the public concerning the location of sex offenders within Arizona.

This site is NOT intended to supplant the community notification process, but rather, it allows the criminal justice community to promote public awareness concerning the potential threat that sex offenders pose to Arizona citizens. An informed public is a safer public!

Realizing that it is impossible to notify every citizen about a sex offender's presence in their community, this site will empower you to obtain information and take the appropriate precautions. Furnishing the public with information regarding convicted sex offenders is a critical step towards encouraging the public to protect themselves from potential future acts. The Arizona Department of Public Safety (DPS) has established this site according to the requirements of A.R.S. 13-3827. DPS is responsible for maintaining the site and annually verifying the addresses of all registered sex offenders.

WARNING This site does not contain information on all convicted sex offenders! Information is only provided for sex offenders with risk assessment scores of Level 2 (Intermediate) or Level 3 (High)!

The Arizona Department of Public Safety updates this information regularly, however, you are cautioned that the information contained on this site may not reflect the current residence, status, or other information regarding the offender! If you believe that any of the information found in these records is in error, please send us your comments.

DEFINITIONS

WARNING: This site does not contain information on all convicted sex offenders! Information is only provided for sex offenders with risk assessment scores of Level 2 (Intermediate) or Level 3 (High)! In accordance with Arizona state law, Level 1 offenders are not notifiable to the public.

The Lake Havasu City Police Department updates this information regularly, however, you are cautioned that the information contained on this site may not reflect the current residence, status, or other information regarding the offender! If you believe that any of the information found in these records is in error, please let us know at contact@lhcazsexoffenders.com.

THE INFORMATION PROVIDED ON THIS SITE IS INTENDED FOR COMMUNITY SAFETY PURPOSES ONLY AND SHOULD NOT BE USED TO THREATEN, INTIMIDATE, OR HARASS. MISUSE OF THIS INFORMATION MAY RESULT IN CRIMINAL PROSECUTION.

Are risk levels consistent nationwide?

No, each state has slightly different community notification laws, implementation dates, and risk assessment instruments. Please check with each state for the latest and complete information.

How is risk level determined?

Prior to an offender's release or sentence to probation, the agency that had custody of the individual completes a risk assessment screening profile. This instrument evaluates nineteen criteria that are considered to be significant factors contributing to sex offender recidivism. Each criterion is given a score, which is then totaled to arrive at the recommended risk level. All criminal justice agencies must use the standardized Arizona Risk Assessment, however, occasionally law enforcement discovers information which can affect an offender's risk level. As such, law enforcement is given the discretion to either accept the recommended risk level or complete another risk assessment.

Level 1

For level one offenders, the local law enforcement agency that is responsible for notification shall maintain information about the offender. The local law enforcement agency may disseminate this information to other law enforcement agencies and may give notification to the people with whom the offender resides. If a level one offender fails to register or reregister pursuant to section 13-3821 or 13-3822 and a warrant is issued, before the issuance of the warrant the law enforcement agency that requested the warrant may assemble, print and distribute appropriate flyers regarding the offender.

Level 2 & Level 3

For level two and level three offenders, the notification shall be made to the surrounding neighborhood, area schools, appropriate community groups and prospective employers. The notification shall include a flyer with a photograph and exact address of the offender as well as a summary of the offender's status and criminal background. A press release and a level two or level three flyer shall be given to the local electronic and print media to enable information to be placed in a local publication. If a level two or level three offender fails to register or reregister pursuant to section 13-3821 or 13-3822 and a warrant is issued, before the issuance of the warrant the law enforcement agency that requested the warrant shall assemble, print and distribute appropriate flyers regarding the offender.

SEX OFFENDER CHARACTERISTICS

  • Arizona has approximately 11,000 registered sex offenders.
  • Sex offenders come from all walks of life and from all socio-economic groups. They can be male or female, rich or poor, employed or unemployed, religious or non-religious, educated or uneducated, and from any race.
  • Although some sex offenders are strangers and stalkers, many know the victim as a family member, friend, or neighbor. They win a child’s trust and then take advantage of that trust.
  • Potential victims are likely to be children that are poor, neglected, loners, or runaways.
  • Many pedophiles seek out mothers of single parent families for the purpose of victimizing children.
  • Sex offenders often like playgrounds and other places where children congregate.
  • Most sex offenders groom their victims prior to any crime.
  • Offenders may position themselves to come into contact with children by:
    • Creating playground environments where victims have access to toys, games, and other things that willlater be traded for sex.
    • Enticing with attention, affection, gifts, promises, and providing alcohol and pornography to lowerinhibitions.
    • Preying on either a parent/teen desire to excel in a sport. They provide extra assistance and offer special attention.
    • Being the "nice guy" in the neighborhood who is willing to entertain children and take them on outings.
    • Operating businesses that hire teens and looking for excuses requiring them to stay after hours, or visit the offenders home.
    • Seeking employment or volunteering where they will be in contact with children and teens.